The following are descriptions of the documents that I prepare in a trust package. All of these documents are tailored to your specific situation:


The Trust (a revocable living trust):

 A document that creates a legal entity which owns property (like a corporation might own property). Initially, you (as Trustee) are in charge of that legal entity. After you (or both of you) die, a successor Trustee will be in charge of the trust and the trust document will tell that Successor Trustee what is to be done with property owned by the trust. Specifically, the trust will tell the Successor Trustee when and how property is to be held for or given to children or others.

Trust Transfer Documents:


 These would include documents which transfer ownership of your personal property to the trust ("Assignment of Personal Property"), and the documents necessary to transfer title of real property ("Trust Transfer Deed" for land and houses) to the Trust. These documents insure that the trust owns property so that a probate can be avoided in the event of your death. I generally charge $50.00 for the transfer of each parcel of California real property.


Durable Power of Attorney (General):

This is a separate document for each spouse so that in the event of the incapacity of one spouse, the other spouse (or, if not married, another named individual) can have authority to deal with property that for some reason may not be owned by the trust.

Advance Directive for Health Care & Durable Power of Attorney:

This is a separate document for each spouse so that in the event of the incapacity of one spouse, the other spouse (or, if not married, another named individual) can have authority to make health care decisions including that "pull the plug" decision where someone is being kept alive only by artificial means.


Will:


This is a separate document for each spouse (just one document if you are not married) which revokes any previous will you might have made, names guardians for your minor children (if you have any), and makes your entire estate plan cohesive. It names the trust as the beneficiary of any property that for some reason is not already owned by the trust at the time of your death.